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Everyone, it seems, has a natural inclination to pursue happiness. This narrative is at odds with the one often propounded, one that explains international and national migrations merely as economic phenomenon. Look at economic differentials, and you can explain and predict mass migrations, or so the economists say. Barone takes issue with this analysis and notes how none of the migrations can be simply explained by this framework.

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They start and stop suddenly, and often not in response to a clear economic change. Barone carefully examines how Southerners, black and white alike, did not move to the North in great numbers for the 75 years between the Civil War and World War II despite massive differences in wages and living standards. He surmises this failure to move was cultural: White Southerners did not feel welcomed in the land of their conquerors, and blacks, despite their near-slavery, did not feel Northerners would greet them with open arms.

The economic doors were open, but the cultural doors were shut. This distinction is at the heart of Mr. Each group seeks not just to earn a living, but to imprint its way of life on its new surroundings. Germans in the 19th century bring beer, books and brotherhood in the form of communal associations like those they left behind. Yankees migrating West in the early 19th century built churches, schools and are as intolerably self-righteous in Ohio as they were in Massachusetts. Southern grandees and their land-poor imitators flock into the Midwest and newly acquired Plains States eager to bring their plantation mentality, and their slaves, with them.

All seek a better economic life, but they differ substantially about how to live that life once comfort is achieved.

Shaping Our Nation by Michael Barone | ewumulitox.tk: Books

These culture clashes are at the root of American politics, Mr. Barone argues. He painstakingly shows how voting patterns follow demographic change, and can endure for centuries. He shows how counties settled by Scots-Irish in the late 18th and early 19th century swung strongly toward fellow Scots-Irishman John McCain in , and how counties settled by Yankees in the early 19th century supplied big majorities for Calvin Coolidge years later. It is these clashes between cultures, not economic arguments, Mr.

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Barone holds, that produce the heated battles that define American politics. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Nov 13, J. It was an idea that went over most high-school heads about 30 years ago, but I've pondered on it from time to time in conjuction with my own observations. And Michael Barone points out rather well how the various surges or waves of immigration haven't necessarily melted into the whole but have still left their mark on the country and its politics.


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Barone covers six distinct and large surges of migration that starts with the Scots-Irish who pushed the colonization further south and west in throught the mids. Next he looks at two internal migrations as "Yankees" in the north and "Southern Grandees" in the south both began to push westward as eastern populations increased. Next are the Irish and German migrations that happened as a result of the potato famines in Europe and lasted from the mids nearly to , when the "Ellis Island" migration took over with Italians and Eastern Europeans.

The next surge is mostly from rural areas to cities and resulted in a smaller migration of blacks from the South to the North. He also covers the almost "melting pot" influence of WWII and the move westward especially to California and the latest migrations from Asia and Mexico. With each section he explores the effects migrations had on politics and public policies. This is not a page-turner kind of book. Instead, with heavy sections of statistics and quite a few statistical maps it's almost borderline reference material.

But at the same time his explanations of why people came from where they did, why they settled where they did, and how they impacted the country politically and socially are extremely readable. From someone who enjoys reading American history, I found it very enlightening, plus, as someone whose forebears came from about 7 or 8 different European countries yes, I'm an American mutt it was insightful to better understand why some of my ancestors came.


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It's not the kind of book that will have broad appeal among all those who read history, but it's a fascinating account of how the country has been shaped by immigrants and really helps one to understand the big picture a little better. Feb 28, Drtaxsacto rated it it was amazing. Barone makes the point that various waves of immigration have helped to shape American politics in different ways. His chapters on the Irish, Scotch and Italians were very enlightening.

But like many of his other work, this is not a dry historical description. His latter chapters about Black migration out of the South and the latest immigrant waves of Hispanics and Asians offer some great insights. One of the key points of the book is that the waves of immigration are not uniform - either in the Barone makes the point that various waves of immigration have helped to shape American politics in different ways.

One of the key points of the book is that the waves of immigration are not uniform - either in the way people came to America or indeed moved from one part of the country to another or in how their particular trend played out length, numbers. There is lots of data about each of the waves, which I found quite interesting.

Dec 10, Frank Roberts rated it really liked it Shelves: history , political-science. Barone gives a keen insight to the history of America and the various migrations, both internal and from abroad, that have marked our culture and our politics. Much of how America does things today, especially in terms of politics, is illuminated by understanding the patterns of settlement and interaction that have taken place in our past. Feb 02, Rama rated it really liked it Shelves: sociology , economics. Migration to the Promised Land; The evolution of the American culture This is an interesting book for anyone interested in American history.

It is full of facts with statistical data and maps in its history right from the colonial days. Some of the results are surprising and the author makes special efforts to delineate the relationship between the migrations of a particular ethnicity to the political outcomes and shaping of American culture. The religious freedom and equal opportunities afforded Migration to the Promised Land; The evolution of the American culture This is an interesting book for anyone interested in American history.

The religious freedom and equal opportunities afforded to all races and nationalities have had implications in the future economic, political and social structure of this country. The nation started with slavery and then the civil war which changed the course of the country for better into a strong and powerful nation in the world. The social and political revolution was always in the works. Two of the most successful generals of the Yankee stock who imbibed Yankee values were Ulysses Grant and William Sherman.

Grant abhorred the abasement of Mexicans in the war in which he served with distinction. William Sherman was appalled by the mores of Louisiana slaveholders when he was stationed there years before the civil war. Grants and Sherman's efforts to enforce the rights of southern blacks during reconstruction were cut short by the public outrage over heavy military spending and unsympathetic to the idea of treating blacks on equal terms with whites. But with the support of emerging German-Scandinavian population and the Scott-Irish led to the defeat of the conflicting American culture of slaveholders.

The presidency was held without exception by slave holders and their sympathizers during the 60 years before the civil war. The civil war is the conflict of Yankee North America over the American culture of slave holders. The remarkable thing about the period from civil war to WWII is not how many southern blacks and whites moved to the North, but how few did.

Very few moved even though the economic incentives and formidable barriers to the movement were lessened. The facts disprove the theory that domestic American migration was primarily an economic phenomenon. For 75 years, the American majority in the North abandoned the reconstruction and let the white majority in the South to run their society without interference.

Shaping Our Nation: How Surges of Migration Transformed America and Its Politics

The migration that did not happen shaped the nation as any other migrations, from overseas, that did occur. The migrations from Europe, Africa and Asia created one of the greatest nations on earth, but such migrations also bought challenges and conflicts.

Those who fought for the union, and those who chose confederacy had their own American dream, which resulted in conflicts of interest and civil war became inevitable. But from the country's beginning, cultural variety and conflict have been a force in American politics and a crucial reason for our rise to power. The founding fathers used a simple formula of limited government, civic equality and religious tolerance amidst cultural diversity and periods of darkness in American history. This equation has worked to a large extent which essentially proves that the founders of this nation were great visionaries.

This is an extremely informative book with a strange, out of place diatribe against black people placed in the middle of it Feb 10, George Miller rated it really liked it. This book traces internal citizens and external immigrants migration in the US, from the Scots-Irish migration that started before the American Revolution, and ending with current "sorting" migration of liberal professionals to liberal areas such as the San Francisco Bay area and Washington DC and of conservative professionals to Dallas, Charlotte, and Atlanta.

Many of the chapters compare and contract two migrations that occurred at the same time: the Yankee expansion across the Northern US This book traces internal citizens and external immigrants migration in the US, from the Scots-Irish migration that started before the American Revolution, and ending with current "sorting" migration of liberal professionals to liberal areas such as the San Francisco Bay area and Washington DC and of conservative professionals to Dallas, Charlotte, and Atlanta. Many of the chapters compare and contract two migrations that occurred at the same time: the Yankee expansion across the Northern US and the Southern Grandee slave holding populations into Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana with exception of New Orleans , Arkansas, and Texas before the Civil War, and the migration of Irish and German settlers in the late s through the s.

Most of these migrations were not predicted and ended abruptly for reasons that were not understood until some time after their end. The book describes the impacts of immigrant cultures on immigrant migrations - i. The book also tracks impacts of technology on migration: i. While there most of the information in this book is not new, the book is well organized an an easy read. Jun 13, Diane rated it it was amazing.

The author seeks to write a continuation of David Hackett Fischer's "Albion's Seed", which looks at the early migration to colonial America and shows how migration from different areas of England produced cultural variation in America. Barone picks up with the Scotch-Irish migration just before the Revolutionary War, and then profiles subsequent surges of migration, as well as migration from the Eastern Seaboard westward across the country.

He explains the causes of each surge of migration, as w The author seeks to write a continuation of David Hackett Fischer's "Albion's Seed", which looks at the early migration to colonial America and shows how migration from different areas of England produced cultural variation in America.

He explains the causes of each surge of migration, as well as following what happened to the migrants once they reached America. He talks somewhat about each group of migrants' long-term impact on politics, although I wish he would have talked more about their cultural impacts. He also only briefly talks about contemporary migration, and while he provides some analogies to earlier waves of migration, I thought he could have given a better overarching assessment of migration in America.

Still, he provides a ton of detail, and the book is well-written, and a fast read, despite its density. Apr 27, Denise Spicer rated it really liked it. This book examines several major stages of immigration to this country, relates lots of statistics and shows some of the effects on the lives of the people already living here. The author offers no predictions for the future as he claims both the beginnings and the endings of these past surges were not anticipated. It is our responsibility, as we contemplate unanticipated surges of migration of the future, to carry forward that tradition.

The worst book I've ever read. The endless cultural insults completely obscured any valid points he made. Pretty decent book of the internal migrations that have ordered the United States and made it what it is today. Erik rated it really liked it Mar 24, John rated it it was ok Oct 23, Chip Douglass rated it really liked it May 24, Kyle D Lawrence rated it it was amazing Mar 31, Erin rated it liked it Jan 25, Paul Catterton rated it really liked it Aug 06, Darrell Keifer rated it really liked it Mar 08, Chris Wolff rated it it was amazing Jan 05,